Senators’ new jersey leaked early

The Ottawa Senators have a new reason to hate the Buffalo Sabres. Turns out that a box of the Senators’ much anticipated new third sweaters — scheduled to be officially launched at a Scotiabank Place open house on Oct. 1 — were inadvertently shipped from a Reebok warehouse in Indianapolis to the Sabres official souvenir shop.

BY KEN WARREN

The Ottawa Senators have a new reason to hate the Buffalo Sabres.

Turns out that a box of the Senators’ much anticipated new third sweaters — scheduled to be officially launched at a Scotiabank Place open house on Oct. 1 — were inadvertently shipped from a Reebok warehouse in Indianapolis to the Sabres official souvenir shop. After an alert shopper spotted the new duds and posted pictures online, the Senators were forced to acknowledge that they were, in fact, the real deal.

The new-look features a barberpole design, with red, white and black horizontal stripes across the front and a stylized “O” in the middle, a tribute to the original Senators franchise, which won 11 Stanley Cups and was one of the founding clubs when the National Hockey League was launched in 1917. The finished product bears a striking resemblance to several other logos which had popped up on the internet during the past few months.

The third sweater will also feature shoulder patches. The left shoulder reads “Senateurs d’Ottawa,” the right shoulder “Ottawa Senators.”

“While we are very disappointed to have our new jersey revealed in this manner, we are pleased to see the early comments from fans are extremely positive,” Jeff Kyle, the Senators vice-president of marketing, said in a release.

“We believe that this jersey will be a top seller in the National Hockey League this season, especially as fans learn the story behind how it was designed.”

Kyle chose to kept many other details secret until the official launch Oct. 1, but he did elaborate on the novelty of the shoulder patches. When the original Senators won the Cup, they proudly wore patches declaring them “world champions.” The new patches are the same shape, but the new writing is a testament to the current club being based in a “bilingual city in a bilingual country.”

Kyle says the Senators have spent two years on the new design, working closely with a fan before finalizing the look.

“We look forward to telling the story of how a fan helped us develop a uniform that incorporates elements of the early Senators team into what we feel will become a truly iconic symbol of Senators hockey,” he said.

Typically, when a team launches a new sweater, it holds exclusive rights to sell the product in its own market for five days. That window was supposed to be from Oct. 1-5.

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